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California officials warn that rotating power outages are possible

Californians are being asked to step up their conservation efforts in a dramatic way to stave off the possibility of rolling blackouts over the next two days. “We have now entered the most intense phase of this heat wave,” Elliot Mainzer, the head of the California Independent System Operator, or Cal ISO, said on Monday. He said that the state’s grid will need about two to three times as much conservation from people across the state at homes and businesses as has been the case recently during flex alerts. The forecast power use for Tuesday is above the highest demand than has ever been experienced in California, he said. | RELATED | California heat wave: A closer look at the dangerous temperatures expected on Labor Day“Our goal is to not see that number,” Mainzer said. | VIDEO BELOW | Cal ISO official talks about need to conserve more power to avoid blackoutsMainzer said that efforts by consumers to pre-cool their homes and take other steps to reduce power during peak late afternoon and evening hours have made a difference so far. Electricity loads have come in about 1,000 megawatts below expectations, about 2% below what was forecast, he said. “Your efforts to flex electricity demand away from those critical hours of 4 to 9 pm have been working well and we really appreciate it,” he said. | VIDEO BELOW | Outdoor workers brace for brutal heat, employers reminded of obligation to protect workers But he cautioned of a looming 2,000- to 4,000-megawatt deficit where much more conservation will be needed. The state hopes to meet the increased forecast with other options like generators and power from other states. Officials said the best thing that people can do to help alleviate strain on the grid is to pre-cool their homes during the daytime. Once the state’s flex alert takes effect from 4 pm to 10 pm, people should: Set the thermostat at 78 degrees or higher, if health permitsAvoid using major appliancesTurn off unnecessary lightsUse fans for coolingUnplug unused itemsOn Wednesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order intended to increase the state’s energy supply temporarily. So far this week, there have not been any unplanned outages reported in relation to excessive use of energy. In 2020, multiple factors including high temperatures and an Oregon wildfire led to several days of rolling blackouts for millions of Californians. Officials have issued flex alerts for six straight days during the current heat wave. | VIDEO BELOW | What is a ‘heat dome?’ The forecast high for Monday in the Valley is 112 degrees, well above the average for this time of year of 92 degrees. Tuesday has the possibility of bringing even hotter temperatures.“It’s going to take all of us,” Mainzer said.SMUD outlines plan for possible rotating outages in Sacramento SMUD said in a release Monday afternoon that it will “exhaust every avenue before rotating outages are called.” It said that if such outages are needed no customers would be without power for more than one hour at a time. Here’s how to find NorCal cooling centersCooling centers across Northern California are set to open this week to allow some residents to get a break from the forecasted week of triple-digit heat.| Read More | Here are the cooling centers opening Thursday amid forecast triple digits in NorCalFollow our KCRA weather team on social mediaChief Meteorologist Mark Finan on Facebook and TwitterMeteorologist Tamara Berg on Facebook and TwitterMeteorologist Melanie Hunter on Facebook and TwitterMeteorologist Eileen Javora on FacebookMeteorologist Dirk Verdoorn on FacebookMeteorologist Heather Waldman on facebook| MORE LIKE THIS | California heat wave: What to know about heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstrokeWatch our forecasts on TV or onlineHere’s where to find our latest video forecast. You can also watch a livestream of our latest newscast here. The banner on our website turns red when we’re live.We’re also streaming on the Very Local app for Roku, Apple TV or Amazon Fire TV.Here is where you can download our app for the latest weather alerts.

Californians are being asked to step up their conservation efforts in a dramatic way to stave off the possibility of rolling blackouts over the next two days.

“We have now entered the most intense phase of this heat wave,” Elliot Mainzer, the head of the California Independent System Operator, or Cal ISO, said on Monday.

He said that the state’s grid will need about two to three times as much conservation from people across the state at homes and businesses as has been the case recently during flex alerts.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The forecast power use for Tuesday is above the highest demand than has ever been experienced in California, he said.

| RELATED | California heat wave: A closer look at the dangerous temperatures expected on Labor Day

“Our goal is to not see that number,” Mainzer said.

| VIDEO BELOW | Cal ISO official talks about need to conserve more power to avoid blackouts

Mainzer said that efforts by consumers to pre-cool their homes and take other steps to reduce power during peak late afternoon and evening hours have made a difference so far.

Electricity loads have come in about 1,000 megawatts below expectations, about 2% below what was forecast, he said.

“Your efforts to flex electricity demand away from those critical hours of 4 to 9 pm have been working well and we really appreciate it,” he said.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

| VIDEO BELOW | Outdoor workers brace for brutal heat, employers reminded of obligation to protect workers

But he cautioned of a looming 2,000- to 4,000-megawatt deficit where much more conservation will be needed.

The state hopes to meet the increased forecast with other options like generators and power from other states.

Officials said the best thing that people can do to help alleviate strain on the grid is to pre-cool their homes during the daytime.

Once the state’s flex alert takes effect from 4 pm to 10 pm, people should:

  • Set the thermostat at 78 degrees or higher, if health permits
  • Avoid using major appliances
  • Turn off unnecessary lights
  • Use fans for cooling
  • Unplug unused items

On Wednesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order intended to increase the state’s energy supply temporarily.

So far this week, there have not been any unplanned outages reported in relation to excessive use of energy. In 2020, multiple factors including high temperatures and an Oregon wildfire led to several days of rolling blackouts for millions of Californians.

Officials have issued flex alerts for six straight days during the current heat wave.

| VIDEO BELOW | What is a ‘heat dome?’

The forecast high for Monday in the Valley is 112 degrees, well above the average for this time of year of 92 degrees. Tuesday has the possibility of bringing even hotter temperatures.

“It’s going to take all of us,” Mainzer said.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

SMUD outlines plan for possible rotating outages in Sacramento

SMUD said in a release Monday afternoon that it will “exhaust every avenue before rotating outages are called.”

It said that if such outages are needed no customers would be without power for more than one hour at a time.

Here’s how to find NorCal cooling centers

Cooling centers across Northern California are set to open this week to allow some residents to get a break from the forecasted week of triple-digit heat.

| Read More | Here are the cooling centers opening Thursday amid forecast triple digits in NorCal

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Follow our KCRA weather team on social media

| MORE LIKE THIS | California heat wave: What to know about heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstroke

Watch our forecasts on TV or online

Here’s where to find our latest video forecast. You can also watch a livestream of our latest newscast here. The banner on our website turns red when we’re live.

We’re also streaming on the Very Local app for Roku, Apple TV or Amazon Fire TV.

Here is where you can download our app for the latest weather alerts.

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